Last Updated: May 16th, 2014 - 12:32:22


Super car show for Super Kids
By Caitlin Davis
Oct 31, 2012, 12:18

photo by Caitin Davis

Despite the looming threat of Hurricane Sandy, chilly temperatures and overcast skies, cars from all different decades filled the parking lot at Prince George High School on Saturday for the seventh annual Super Kids Car and Bike Show.

Barbara Kincaid, with Super Kids and the local Civitan Club, said that even though the car show had to be postponed because of the rain last month, she was pleased to see the turnout and the heart behind the wheels of the car owners.

“Everybody that came out came out for the Super Kids,” Kincaid said. “It just seems like each year, we get more and more people that are learning about the Super Kids.”

As Gene Jones, of Dinwiddie and Donnie Bostic, of Dinwiddie browsed the open hoods and trunks at the show on Saturday, both said they came for not only the cars but for the cause.

“We have been coming for years,” Jones said. “It is for a good cause.”

Kincaid explained that Super Kids, a Prince George based ministry that seeks to provide safe and supervised activities for individuals with intellectual disabilities, was started by Delores Lane. Lane’s twin sister Frances had Down syndrome, and as the girls grew older, Lane noticed her sister was different from her peers and needed her own friends as well, Kincaid said.

Kincaid said Lane’s sister went to Eagle Eyrie, a camp for children with disabilities, and loved it. Lane wanted to start a camp locally for children with mental and physically disabilities. Out of that desire came Super Kids. Now, more than 30 years later, Super Kids events attract 50 regular attendees from all over the Tri-Cities area.

Kincaid said the car show is the biggest fundraiser for the Super Kids. Last year the car show brought in over $10,000. In addition to supporting regular activities, some of the funds go towards the construction of a group home, where individuals with intellectual disabilities will be able to live with on site care.

The reason a car show was selected as the best way to raise funds is fairly simple.

“Men love cars and so do women,” Kincaid said.

As Jones and Bostic looked around at the cars and talked about restoring their own, they proved Kincaid’s statement true.

“I like them all,” Jones said. “I am an old car nut.”
photo by Caitiln Davis The 1950s came to Prince George on Saturday during the Superkids Car Show as Jack Parslow, of Powhatan, showcased his rare 1951 Dodge Roadster.

Bostic, who won GMC Outstanding Muscle Car at the car show, talked about his 1969 Chevelle. He got the car when he was 15 years old and has restored it several times.

“It’s got to be something you enjoy,” Bostic said. “You have to have a passion for it. A lot of people wouldn’t do it.”

Jack Parslow, of Powhatan, another car enthusiast, brought the spirit of the 1950s to the car show, with his 1951 Dodge Roadster and props to create the feel of a 1950s drive-in theater in the parking lot of a modern high school.

“I love old cars,” Parslow said. “Riding them, driving them, enjoying them.”

Parslow, who has had the car for 15 years, said the car is very rare. He said they only made 1,002 of the Roadster. He said he thinks there are only five left, and two are in a museum.

Even the rare and flashy cars couldn’t distract from the reason they were all parked in the high school parking lot on Saturday.

Kincaid said while she loved the cars, especially a 1958 Cadillac, the best part was seeing the car owners return to Prince George.

“Seeing the dedication of our car owners to the car show,” Kincaid said. “They come because of our kids. They always come back.”

Bill Heygster, of Pasadena, MD, with his 2004 Corvette, won a trophy for traveling the most miles to come to the car show, 192 to be exact. Heygster came to the show for the first time three years ago and has been back ever since.

“They treated us so nice the first time,” Heygster said. “It is a great cause and we decided to come back. We’ll be back next year.”

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